Test Retake: Should I Cancel My SAT/ACT Score?

April 14, 2016

We all know the feeling. That horrible feeling after walking out of an exam, and the only thoughts running through your mind are about how terribly you just did on that test. Unfortunately, the SATs and ACTs are no different, and the fear of doing badly is magnified. Since the two tests are so important, lots of students leave the test room thinking they did poorly.

If you’ve taken the test, you know you have two options: persevere and hope that your scores aren’t as bad as you think, or cancel them. But the real question is, should you ever actually cancel your scores?

Applying to college next year?
View the application files, essays and advice of accepted students.
LEARN MORE

The most likely answer is no. Unless there were circumstances that you absolutely know caused you to do poorly, like illness, filling out the answer sheet incorrectly, or not filling out entire sections of the exam, you shouldn’t cancel. Luckily, most schools will superscore (taking the best section scores from all tests, combined into one ‘superscore’) your SAT and ACT, so even if you only did well on one section, it’s worth keeping.

If you really do want to cancel, make your move quickly. Though you can do it before you even leave the test building, it’s better to wait. You have until 11:59ET on the first Wednesday after you take the SAT (noon on the Thursday after you take the ACT), so you do have a few days to think about it.

Remember: you can always retake the test again. And again, if you choose. Oftentimes, you think you did much worse than you actually did. You question every answer you marked down on that answer sheet, and probably think that there’s no way you got anything right. But once you calm down and the fear subsides, you’ll realize you probably did just fine.

Sources: acceptedtocollege.com, The Examiner, Prep Scholar, US News. 

 

About The Author

AdmitSee Staff
AdmitSee Staff

​We remember our frustration with applying to college and the lack of information surrounding it. So we created AdmitSee to bring much-needed transparency to the application process! Read more about the team here.




Browse Successful Application Files

nten_nyiam
MIT ‘23


Accepted to MIT, CalTech, UChicago, Macaulay Honors

I am a technologically inclined person who likes puzzles, video games, tutoring, late night cramming, and helping others.
camrynstafford
Princeton ‘23


Accepted to Princeton, Columbia, Fordham, Indiana, NYU, UT Austin, UMich

Dancer with a hardcore business mind
alm25
UT Austin ‘19


Accepted to UC Berkeley, USC, UMich, Illinois, UT Austin, UC Davis, UC Irvine, UCSD, UCSB, U of Minnesota, Arizona, WVU, Cal Poly, San Jose State

I'm from the SF Bay Area, but I'm betraying my roots by attending The University of Texas at Austin as a chemical engineering major. I like music, science and eating!
niathuravil
Rutgers ‘20


Accepted to Rutgers, NYU, Fordham, UMass, Colorado, MSU, Illinois, Arizona, Washington

Your local dancing astronaut with a passion for the political things in life.

New Posts

Education, Access and Systemic Racism
Education, Access and Systemic Racism
June 07, 2020

The recent killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery, among so many others in the Black community who have been robbed of their lives over the years by the brutal and fatal use...

How to Get Off the College Waitlist (5 Go-To Strategies)
How to Get Off the College Waitlist (5 Go-To Strategies)
March 31, 2020

Getting waitlisted is undoubtedly disappointing, but it's not the end of the road. Here are 4 ways aside from a letter of continued interest to turn your "Waitlisted" status into an "Acceptance."1) Updates to your applicationIf...

College admissions prep during the Coronavirus
College admissions prep during the Coronavirus
March 18, 2020

5 ways you can college prep while self isolating. Schools may be closed and standardized SAT and ACT tests may be postponed as entire communities attempt to slow the spread of Covid-19, but that doesn’t...

Load More Posts