Why Your College Degree Is Worth It

April 04, 2016

college student getting a job
Every year, it seems that more questions arise surrounding the importance of a college degree. From average salary after college to ease of employment, many are wondering whether it’s actually necessary to spend thousands and thousands for a degree. As it stands, about 86% of employed college graduates say that they currently have “career” jobs, compared to just 57% of high school diploma earners.

However, the most recent Class of 2015 college graduates faced high rates of both unemployment and underemployment, and it seems as though future classes will face similar problems. Even given that, though, 89% of graduates agree: college is worth it. So what steps can current college students take to make their degree worth it?

Take advantage of your career center. These days, colleges have great career centers. By talking with advisors and other staffers, you can get great help and reach out to alumni networks all over. Even if you aren’t sure exactly what industry you want to get into, depending on your school, you can get personalized resume help and career advice.

Be real but professional. College is the perfect place to be social. But, as we’ve mentioned in the past, colleges pay attention to who you are, and so do companies. It’s always good practice to clean up your social media and start your life as a professional. That’s not to say you shouldn’t have fun - but since you’re headed into the professional working world, it’s important to reflect that.

 

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Understand your interests. One of the first steps to finding a career that you’re passionate about is understanding yourself. Though you’re not expected to know what you want to do for the rest of your life, it’s much easier have a direction when applying to jobs. Otherwise, you might find yourself lost on what to do. Plenty of companies are more interested in people who are excited to work there, so finding a path to follow will help.

Reach out to family, friends, and alumni. Is there a job or company that you already have in mind? While career centers are a great resource to use, networking can help a lot. Join LinkedIn (if you haven’t already), and reach out to family members, friends, former teachers, alumni, and whoever else you can think of. Keeping good relationships can help you find a job in the long run, and at the very least, provide you with great advice.

Learn your craft. What are you good at? How about what you’re not as good at? Though you might not know it, being able to answer those two questions might just get you in the door for a second round job interview. It’s okay if you’re not good at everything - it’s more a matter of how you look to improve. Set aside an hour each day to really hone your skills, or take classes to help out. General Assembly, Khan Academy, edX, and more can give you quick and easy opportunities to brush up on or pick up a new topic or two.

Sources: Forbes, Fast Company, Time, Pew

 

About The Author

Drew Evans
Drew Evans

​Drew is a content and social media guru. When he’s not working, he loves to photograph, play music, play sports, and travel. He is also weirdly obsessed with Thai food, Girl Scout cookies, and learning new languages (even though he’s not fluent in any). For any editorial ideas, contact info@admitsee.com.




Browse Successful Application Files

VivienneEve23
UC Berkeley ‘20


Accepted to UC Berkeley, Brown, Claremont (CMC), Columbia, Cornell, Harvard, Northwestern, Pomona, Stanford, San Diego, Vanderbilt, UCSC, UCSB, UCSD, UCLA, Cal Poly, Cal Poly Pomona, Washington

Los Angeles kid attending UC Berkeley, Class of 2020! Planning on studying business or economics. Go Bears!
ArkBuilder
Stanford ‘20


Accepted to Stanford, Wheaton, Pomona

I love languages, exercising, and eating!
littlegreentre…
Stanford ‘19


Accepted to Cambridge, Stanford, Princeton, Yale, Brown, UPenn, Columbia, UC Berkeley, UCLA, Swarthmore, Barnard, Wellesley, Duke, NYU, BU

overly ambitious, passionately curious, helplessly perfectionistic
mouse43
Yale ‘20


Accepted to Yale, UMich, Cornell, UC Berkeley, UCLA, UCSD, UCSB

Here to mentor and guide you!

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