A Guide to Every Freshman Year You’ll Experience

June 14, 2016

Freshman year sucks. Well, not really - but whether you’re a freshman in high school, college, or life, the transition isn’t easy. It’s filled with new experiences and new rules that you’ll likely have never heard of before, so it’s hard to get used to. While people might warn you about the things you’re likely to face, you probably won’t find out what you can do to prepare for your new lifestyle that you’ll undoubtedly have. Here are just the three best ways that you can prepare for your high school, college, and post-college first years:

High School:

1. Learning the keys to social life in high school is definitely one of the most awkward and frustrating times. The best thing you can do early on is find at least one friend in each class. It’ll make the transition a lot easier - not only will you have a friend to bond with, you’ll also have someone to study with, starting early.

2. One of the toughest things about high school is managing your time properly. Luckily, there are plenty of apps and programs to use on both your smartphone and computer. Notes organizers, reminders, to-do lists, and calendars are just a handful of utilities that you can take advantage of to help out. Getting on top of time management early in high school can set good habits for later on.

3. Don’t be afraid to talk to your teachers. They’re there to help you learn, so if you do have questions about anything, they’ll be there to support you. Plenty of students aren’t willing to ask for help, so it’s easy to fall into the pack and not reach out or raise questions in class. But it’s better to get out ahead of something you might not understand or material you’re having trouble with, especially before an assignment or exam.

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College:

1. Try things out. Most universities have a plethora of clubs available to you across all different types of activities. Whether you’re interested in playing sports, watching TV, reading books, or anything academic, odds are, your school will have a club for it. It’s a great way to meet people and find new interests, and it’s also the perfect way to bolster your resume by pursuing personal interests.

2. Search and find the perfect place for you to study. It might seem like a dumb thing to start with, but there are plenty of students who go through the year, bouncing from study hall to library without ever getting comfortable. Something as simple as studying in the same place can actually help you improve your learning, so it’s worth taking the first few weeks of classes to find the best spot for you.

3. Get to know your campus resources, whether it’s meeting with your academic advisor or finding the best places to grab a bite to eat. The little things make a huge difference in college, especially considering you’re fully in charge of your own life for what’s probably the first time. Balancing your time between academics and social life when you have so much freedom isn’t an easy thing to do, but using all the resources that your college has to offer can certainly help.

Post-College:

1. Network. One of the most important aspects of your post-college life is building and expanding your network. Not only can it lead to job opportunities, it’s a good way to have contacts in various areas for any number of reasons. Beyond that, having an expansive network is a good way to reach out for help - if you’re having an issue with a project that you’re working on, contact someone who has done something similar for an explanation or a new perspective.

2. Get on LinkedIn right now. No seriously - these days, not having a LinkedIn profile is going to hurt you a lot more than you think. Employers and connections always expect to find a profile for every realistic candidate, so creating one is extremely important. It’s the perfect way to showcase your experience, leadership, and any extra important honors or certificates you’ve earned. Plus, it’s the best way to quickly and easily grow your network, and it’s an even easier way to interact with people you’re looking to reach out to.

3. Your resume is a living, breathing thing, but most people forget that. If you have experience that’s a good fit for one job opportunity but not for another, don’t be afraid to swap it out for something else. Change terms, edit bullet points, or remove an entire past job if you think it’ll help. It’s not permanent, so update it on a consistent basis.

About The Author

Drew Evans
Drew Evans

​Drew is a content and social media guru. When he’s not working, he loves to photograph, play music, play sports, and travel. He is also weirdly obsessed with Thai food, Girl Scout cookies, and learning new languages (even though he’s not fluent in any). For any editorial ideas, contact info@admitsee.com.




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Bhenrique
UC Berkeley ‘19


Accepted to UC Berkeley, Penn State, Colorado, UCLA, NYU

Passionate about Education. Lover of all things science!
lmelcher
Columbia ‘20


Accepted to Columbia, Brown, UPenn, Rice, UC Berkeley, UCLA, UVA, UC Davis, UCSD, UCSC, USC

Hey! I'm a John Jay Scholar at Columbia, and I'm from Los Angeles. I'm planning to major in Art History and do ballet and theater. Hope I can help!
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Williams ‘20


Accepted to Williams, Claremont (CMC), Amherst, Swarthmore, Pitzer, Northwestern, Tufts, WashU, Grinnell, Rice, Emory, LMU

I’m an Econ & Bio major (and transfer) passionate about social justice, STEM, and design. I’ve learned a lot after going through this hectic process twice, and I’m excited to help!
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UPenn ‘20


Accepted to UPenn

Hello! I'm a Freshman at the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School. I plan on concentrating in finance, marketing and social impact. In high school I was active in LGBTQ advocacy and music. I can help with any questions you have about admissions

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