Ways to Get Around Paying Out-of-State Tuition

November 22, 2014

Tuition plays a huge role in deciding where students will attend college. With rising costs of going to college, many students are having to focus solely on the financial aid offerings of a school rather than the academics and educational opportunities. For some, this means limiting themselves in-state public schools, in order to only have to pay the in-state tuition. Recently, however, programs have been established that allow students to attend certain colleges in a different state without having to pay the out-of-state tuition.

In certain regions around the United States, close range states have come up with agreements to allow in-state tuition to students living in their common area. Four of these programs include:

New England Board of Higher Education - Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont

Midwestern Higher Education Compact - Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, and North Dakota

Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education - Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming

Southern Regional Education Board Academic Common Market - Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia

Of course, not all schools within these common states allow students to receive in-state tuition. Also, other requirements may need to be made in order to be eligible.

Other programs exist that allow in-state tuition depending on what field you are planning on going into - especially among schools offering health degrees. 

These programs are not the only way to achieve in-state tuition while living out of state. If you live close to the border of another state, you can sometimes be granted in-state tuition by the neighboring state. More drastic measures include declaring yourself independent from your parents and becoming an in-state resident of a different state during college. This involves registering to vote and pay taxes to the new state. You may be able to “live” with relatives from a different state for a period of time prior to college and become available for in-state tuition for that states’ schools.

Don’t limit yourself to schools within your own state because of the cost. You should check with all schools you are interested in to see their policies on in-state and out-of-state tuitions. You can go to your dream school AND get a good deal!

 

 



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